Wednesday, 23 April 2014

Hate

The writer Can Wu escaped China in 2008, just as the Beijing Games were taking place. With the help of friends, he ended up in Hamburg where he set out to write fragments of his life, fragments of a world that is slowly coming apart. Through diary entries, short stories and his classic story Rimbaud in Her Eyes, Can Wu takes us through the dark heart of China. And history...



This story is taken from my new book I, Can (Fragments of a life)

Hate

The anti-Semite turns to me and says, “I never heard of a Chinese Jew before.”
His knowledge of history is, not surprisingly, minimal, and his ideas (and ideals) belong to the cave age.
“Actually, if you do some research on the subject, you will see that Jewish settlers are documented in China as early as the 7th or 8th century CE,” I say.
I could tell him all about the Jewish communities that developed through the Tang and Song Dynasties (7th to 12th centuries CE) all the way through the Qing Dynasty (19th century), but the anti-Semite is blind; he is the shadow of hate.
“Kaifeng Jews?” I say and the anti-Semite sneers at me before making his way out of the café. Outside is below zero but the anti-Semite embraces the cold and hurries along, bumping into a couple of people but he never looks back or apologises for his actions.
Hate is what drives him on.
That’s why he can’t see a thing.


My new book I, Can (Fragments of a life) is available on Amazon

UFOs in Chile

Still staying with this UFOs matter, a retired Chilean Air Force General, Mr. Ricardo Bermúdez, who also happens to be the director of the Committee of Studies of Anomalous Aerial Phenomena, also spotted a massive object in the sky on March 18, just a few days after that UFO was spotted in Australia (maybe the aliens are doing sightseeing), and according to local publication Notias Terra (as translated for Inexplicata): “After considerable research time, we reached a series of conclusions … [First, that this photograph is real and not a hoax; second, that the incidence of the light in these clouds is the same as that which falls upon the object; third, that it has its own light, and therefore a series of portholes are visible. This is according to our Ph.D in meteorology, and according to the clouds existing at the time during that season in the Cordillera, makes it twice the size of the National Stadium (in Chile).”
He further explained: “We receive over a thousand reports each year and 95 percent are anomalous phenomena that we can fully justify. We discard 2 percent from the remaining 5 per cent, leaving us with 3 percent to which no scientific answer can be found. This is being studied because it is real and occurring worldwide.”

So what’s happening?
Are we being visited by aliens?
Let’s hope they can fix the mess that is our planet right now.


My book I, Can (Fragments of a life) is available on Amazon Kindle 

Footage of UFO sighting in Gold Coast, Queensland. 13/3/14



UFOs in Australia
There hasn’t been that many news lately about UFOs or so I thought, but a quick research online told me that there has been a few sightings all over the world. Yes, this is what I do when I’m bored or have a few spare minutes; I search for UFO news. Come on; don’t tell me you aren’t curious?
Anyway, last month, on March 13th, Jack Purcell filmed an object in the sky for a long period of time, this on Chevron Island, Australia, and afterwards he and his other and some friends called the police who arrived and joined them to watch the object. Shortly afterwards a police helicopter was called and went to check it out, and Purcell said, “The police chopper would fly near it, but then it would turn its lights off and disappear.”
“It was really strange. I was quite skeptical of these things, but it just blew my mind. … I have no idea what it was, but in my guess, I think it’s a UFO despite how crazy that might sound.”

As usual, a spokeswoman for Gold Coast Police told News.com.au it was likely a radio-controlled device, otherwise radars would have picked it up, but Purcell said he’s sure it wasn’t a radio-controlled device. What do you think? (See video above)
And wasn’t the Queensland coast hit by a storm this month?
Surely the two aren’t related?

Tuesday, 22 April 2014

10th October 2008

The writer Can Wu escaped China in 2008, just as the Beijing Games were taking place. With the help of friends, he ended up in Hamburg where he set out to write fragments of his life, fragments of a world that is slowly coming apart. Through diary entries, short stories and his classic story Rimbaud in Her Eyes, Can Wu takes us through the dark heart of China. And history...


Stories taken from my new book, I, Can (Fragments of a life)

10th October 2008
I left Beijing behind once and for all, and, as sad as it is, I know I won’t ever go back because, no matter how hard some of us fight for it, no good changes will be arriving in my country for a long time.
So I said farewell.
If the authorities lay their hands on me again, they will put on their “magic act” and make me disappear for good. They’re really good with their “magic acts”, yes sir, they are. Look at how many people they made disappear throughout the ages?
I left everything behind me; friends, family, ex-lovers, books, records, etc, etc. I burnt all my diaries and poems, but I saved most of them in my head. Later on, if I have to, I will go back and get them all out of my head.
I didn’t want to but I had no choice but to leave.
Everyone was so busy with the Olympics that they failed to see me leave.
I managed to escape right under their noses and I travelled to Yunnan, carrying a shoulder bag with some clothes in it, my passport and some money, and a book of poems by Su Hui. Mira was waiting for me in Germany and she couldn’t believe her eyes when she saw me at the airport. It was thanks to her (and her help and money) that I managed to escape.
Germany is nice. The air is cold but clean, clear, breathable. I arrived here with only a few clothes, not warm enough for this cold weather, but Mira took me to some shops and bought me some nice warm clothes. I’m so grateful to her, so grateful. I told her, “One day I will pay you for all this.”
She gave me a sad smile and said, “You don’t have to pay me for anything. G-d wants us to help one another.”
Yesterday she told me about her people, the Jewish people, and how much they suffered throughout the centuries. It was like having an extended History lesson. I listened and I cried. We cried together. She showed me pictures of survivors of the Holocaust, their bodies showing the strain and pain they had gone through, and as I looked at it, at those pictures, China’s Great Famine came to my mind.
I told her, “The word human should no longer be used by anyone. What kind of human being does these things to another human being?
“And love? What the hell is love? How can anyone talk about it and then close their eyes to what’s happening around them?”
Mira held my hands and said, “You have to believe.”
“Believe?” I almost laughed on her face.
I told her about the Great Famine, how children begged officials for food and were then taken to their deaths.
She told me about Auschwitz and about the Jewish children who were victims of medical experiments’, about Dr. Josef Mengele and the Romani children that suffered under his hands. How he would bring them sweets and toys, acting like an angel, and then he would guide them to the gas chamber, showing them what a demon he was. Dr. Josef Mengele, the monster who tried to change eye colour by injecting chemicals into children’s eyes. Vera Alexander, a Jewish inmate at Auschwitz, said she remember one day seeing a set of twins return from one of Dr. Josef’s experiment and they had been sewn together, back to back, like Siamese twins. Mira’s face was covered in tears as she told me all this. The twins, Guido and Ina, aged four, aged four for the love of G-d, screamed day and night, and their parents, somehow, managed to get some morphine and killed the children in order to end their suffering.
We looked at one another without knowing what to say, but seconds later I was telling her more tales of horror.
I told her about a teenager who killed and ate her four-year-old brother because she was starving and Mira looked shocked. I told her about thousands of cases of cannibalism, torture and death, farmers being beaten to death.
We were on a roll by then, a roll of tears, of insanity, madness, the sad history of our world, and she told me about the trains carrying the Jews to their deaths, the mass graves at Zolochiv, the Tunisian Jews who died in slave labor camps during the German occupation, and how Europe and the world at first ignored the suffering of the Jewish people. Everyone closed their eyes to injustice. They are still doing that when it comes to China.
I told her about Mao. She told me about Hitler. Then we looked silently at one another and she said a prayer in Hebrew. I couldn’t understand a word of what she was saying but it sounded so beautiful.

Kicks

The writer Can Wu escaped China in 2008, just as the Beijing Games were taking place. With the help of friends, he ended up in Hamburg where he set out to write fragments of his life, fragments of a world that is slowly coming apart. Through diary entries, short stories and his classic story Rimbaud in Her Eyes, Can Wu takes us through the dark heart of China. And history...





Stories taken from my new book, I, Can (Fragments of a life)


Kicks (in Germany)

1942. The soldiers entered the cell and, without saying a word, started to kick the poor Jewish poet until he could no longer move. Afterwards, once they saw that the poet was dead, one of them lit a cigarette and said, “Hell, let’s go and have a beer.”
And they all laughed.



Kicks (in China)

2002. The police officers entered the cell and, without saying a word, started to kick the poor Chinese dissident. “You want freedom? I’ll give you freedom,” one of the officers said. They beat the dissident to a pulp, until he was no longer breathing. Afterwards, once they saw that the dissident was dead, one of the police officers lit a cigarette and said, “There. Now he’s free.”

And they all laughed.